The Importance of Children's Nutrition
By Dr. Anne Georgulas
May 02, 2022

Make sure your child is following a healthy, balanced diet.

One in 5 school children is considered obese in the US. So, how do we stop these statistics from getting any higher? It starts with proper nutrition, regular exercise, and a healthy lifestyle. Your child's pediatrician can always provide some helpful tips for ensuring your child is getting the vitamins and nutrients they need.

Daily Caloric Guidelines By Age

The number of calories your child consumes every day will depend on their age and their activity levels and gender. These are the caloric guidelines you should follow,

  • 2-3 years old (both girls and boys): 1,000-1,400 calories
  • 4-8 years old (boys): 1,200-2,000 calories
  • 4-8 years old (girls): 1,200-1,800 calories
  • 9-13 years old (boys): 1,600-2,600 calories
  • 9-13 years old (girls): 1,400-2,200 calories
  • 14-18 years old (boys): 2,000-3,200 calories
  • 14-18 years old (girls): 1,800-2,400 calories

Incorporating the Right Foods into Your Child’s Diet

It’s important that your child is getting a variety of healthy foods to ensure that they get all the essential vitamins and nutrients they need to grow up strong and healthy. This includes,

Lean protein: This includes seafood, poultry, eggs, beans, and nuts

Vegetables: It’s important to incorporate many vegetables into your child’s diet every day. This can include everything from leafy greens to vibrant peppers to beans. If you do choose canned vegetables, make sure to check nutrition labels to ensure that there isn’t added sugar or sodium.

Fruits: Stay away from fruit juice, which can have a ton of added sugar, and opt for fresh or frozen fruit instead. Also, limit dried fruits, which can be high in calories.

Whole grains: Whole grains provide more benefits than refined grains (e.g., white bread and rice) and include whole-wheat bread, oatmeal, quinoa, and brown rice.

Dairy: Include some low-fat or fat-free dairy products such as yogurt, cheese, or milk into your child’s daily diet.

While sugar won’t cause harm in moderation, it is important to limit added sugars and trans and saturated fats (found in red meat, full-fat dairy, and poultry). Wonder if your child’s diet gives them all the nutrients they need? This is something that your pediatrician can discuss with you during their next well-child visit.

Are you having challenges helping your child maintain a healthy weight? Are you concerned about their health? If so, it’s time to turn to your child’s pediatrician. They can provide you with strategies to help your child eat healthier and maintain a healthy weight.

Comments: